Half of women voters say that increased restrictions on abortion in several states make them more likely to vote in this year’s elections, and over a third say it makes them much more likely. Men voters respond similarly, though they say it’s less of an issue.

Compared to Independent women, partisan women on both sides are feeling more intensely that they will vote due to increased restrictions on abortion. White women are more likely than AAPI women, Black women, or Latina women to be much more likely to vote as a result of increased restrictions on abortion. Rural and urban women are slightly more likely than suburban women to be much more likely to vote as a result of increased restrictions on abortion.

Across age cohorts, women voters say they are more likely to vote as a result of the increased restrictions on abortion in a number of states. Women in their thirties and forties are slightly less likely than other cohorts to be much more likely to vote.

Data can be made available on request, please email AIT’s Director of Research at pelangovan@aitogether.org.

Methodology

The survey was administered by Emerson College Polling and advised by Lake Research Partners. Data was collected March 29-31, 2022. The national sample was n=1000 registered voters, with a margin of error of +/-3%. The survey also oversampled 400 Black voters, 400 Latino/a voters, and 400 Asian American/Pacific Islander voters (margin of error of +/-4.9% for all oversamples). The oversamples were weighted down to reflect their actual proportion in the national sample. The data sets were weighted by age, ethnicity, party affiliation, education, gender, and region based on 2020 voter turnout model. It is important to remember that subsets based on gender, age, ethnicity, and region carry with them higher margins of error, as the sample size is reduced. Data was collected using a cellphone sample of SMS-to-web, an online panel, and an Interactive Voice Response (IVR) system of landlines.